The Truth About Postville

When Erik Camayd-Freixas, Ph.D., was called up for an interpreting job in Iowa, he had no idea that he was about to encounter one of the most trying events of his career.

Dr. Camayd-Freixas worked as an interpreter for the hundreds of detained immigrants after the largest immigration workplace raid in history, in Postville, Iowa. Because of his unique position navigating between the immigrants and the legal system they faced, Dr. Camayd-Freixas got a behind-the-scenes view of exactly how our country’s immigration policy works. He was horrified by what he witnessed.

Deeply disturbed by the broken system, Dr. Camayd-Freixas has spoken out about his experience – a rare move for an interpreter who is bound by confidentiality.

Today the New York Times published an article about the interpreter’s brave stand against what is clearly an injust immigration system.

“It is quite unusual that a legal interpreter would go to this length of writing up an essay and taking a strong stance,” said Nataly Kelly, an analyst with Common Sense Advisory, a marketing research company focused on language services.

That he has taken this strong and vocal stance, for the first time in his 23-year career as an interpreter, speaks to the gravity of what he witnessed in Postville.

Professor Camayd-Freixas said he had considered withdrawing from the assignment, but decided instead that he could play a valuable role by witnessing the proceedings and making them known.

He suggested many of the immigrants could not have knowingly committed the crimes in their pleas. “Most of the clients we interviewed did not even know what a Social Security card was or what purpose it served,” he wrote.

He said many immigrants could not distinguish between a Social Security card and a residence visa, known as a green card. They said they had purchased fake documents from smugglers in Postville, or obtained them directly from supervisors at the Agriprocessors plant. Most did not know that the original cards could belong to Americans and legal immigrants, Mr. Camayd-Freixas said.

Ms. Smith [an attorney] went repeatedly over the charges and the options available to her clients, Professor Camayd-Freixas said. He cited the reaction of one Guatemalan, Isaías Pérez Martínez: “No matter how many times his attorney explained it, he kept saying, ‘I’m illegal, I have no rights. I’m nobody in this country. Just do whatever you want with me.’

Dr. Camayd-Freixas has written a tell-all report based on his experience interpreting after the ICE Raid in Postville, Iowa. It is an eye-opening and heart-wrenching account of just how our current “enforcement only” policy works.

Everyone should read the full report, posted at the Sanctuary. It is long, but it will be worth every minute. Here are a few noteworthy excerpts:

Echoing what I think was the general feeling, one of my fellow interpreters would later exclaim: “When I saw what it was really about, my heart sank…”  Then began the saddest procession I have ever witnessed, which the public would never see, because cameras were not allowed past the perimeter of the compound (only a few journalists came to court the following days, notepad in hand). Driven single-file in groups of 10, shackled at the wrists, waist and ankles, chains dragging as they shuffled through, the slaughterhouse workers were brought in for arraignment, sat and listened through headsets to the interpreted initial appearance, before marching out again to be bused to different county jails, only to make room for the next row of 10. They appeared to be uniformly no more than 5 ft. tall, mostly illiterate Guatemalan peasants with Mayan last names, some being relatives (various Tajtaj, Xicay, Sajché, Sologüí…), some in tears; others with faces of worry, fear, and embarrassment.  They all spoke Spanish, a few rather laboriously. It dawned on me that, aside from their nationality, which was imposed on their people in the 19th century, they too were Native Americans, in shackles. They stood out in stark racial contrast with the rest of us as they started their slow penguin march across the makeshift court. “Sad spectacle” I heard a colleague say, reading my mind. They had all waived their right to be indicted by a grand jury and accepted instead an information or simple charging document by the U.S. Attorney, hoping to be quickly deported since they had families to support back home. But it was not to be. They were criminally charged with “aggravated identity theft” and “Social Security fraud” -charges they did not understand… and, frankly, neither could I.  Everyone wondered how it would all play out.


At the local high school, only three of the 15 Latino students came back on Tuesday, while at the elementary and middle school, 120 of the 363 children were absent. In the following days the principal went around town on the school bus and gathered 70 students after convincing the parents to let them come back to school; 50 remained unaccounted for. Some American parents complained that their children were traumatized by the sudden disappearance of so many of their school friends. The principal reported the same reaction in the classrooms, saying that for the children it was as if ten of their classmates had suddenly died. Counselors were brought in. American children were having nightmares that their parents too were being taken away. The superintendant said the school district’s future was unclear: “This literally blew our town away.” In some cases both parents were picked up and small children were left behind for up to 72 hours. Typically, the mother would be released “on humanitarian grounds” with an ankle GPS monitor, pending prosecution and deportation, while the husband took first turn in serving his prison sentence. Meanwhile the mother would have no income and could not work to provide for her children. Some of the children were born in the U.S. and are American citizens. Sometimes one parent was a deportable alien while the other was not. “Hundreds of families were torn apart by this raid,” said a Catholic nun. “The humanitarian impact of this raid is obvious to anyone in Postville. The economic impact will soon be evident.”

But this was only the surface damage. Alongside the many courageous actions and expressions of humanitarian concern in the true American spirit, the news blogs were filled with snide remarks of racial prejudice and bigotry, poorly disguised beneath an empty rhetoric of misguided patriotism, not to mention the insults to anyone who publicly showed compassion, safely hurled from behind a cowardly online nickname. One could feel the moral fabric of society coming apart beneath it all.


That first interview, though, took three hours. The client, a Guatemalan peasant afraid for his family, spent most of that time weeping at our table, in a corner of the crowded jailhouse visiting room. How did he come here from Guatemala? “I walked.” What? “I walked for a month and ten days until I crossed the river.” We understood immediately how desperate his family’s situation was. He crossed alone, met other immigrants, and hitched a truck ride to Dallas, then Postville, where he heard there was sure work. He slept in an apartment hallway with other immigrants until employed. He had scarcely been working a couple of months when he was arrested. Maybe he was lucky: another man who began that Monday had only been working for 20 minutes. “I just wanted to work a year or two, save, and then go back to my family, but it was not to be.” His case and that of a million others could simply be solved by a temporary work permit as part of our much overdue immigration reform. “The Good Lord knows I was just working and not doing anyone any harm.” This man, like many others, was in fact not guilty. “Knowingly” and “intent” are necessary elements of the charges, but most of the clients we interviewed did not even know what a Social Security number was or what purpose it served. This worker simply had the papers filled out for him at the plant, since he could not read or write Spanish, let alone English. But the lawyer still had to advise him that pleading guilty was in his best interest. He was unable to make a decision. “You all do and undo,” he said. “So you can do whatever you want with me.” To him we were part of the system keeping him from being deported back to his country, where his children, wife, mother, and sister depended on him. He was their sole support and did not know how they were going to make it with him in jail for 5 months. None of the “options” really mattered to him. Caught between despair and hopelessness, he just wept. He had failed his family, and was devastated. I went for some napkins, but he refused them. I offered him a cup of soda, which he superstitiously declined, saying it could be “poisoned.” His Native American spirit was broken and he could no longer think. He stared for a while at the signature page pretending to read it, although I knew he was actually praying for guidance and protection. Before he signed with a scribble, he said: “God knows you are just doing your job to support your families, and that job is to keep me from supporting mine.” There was my conflict of interest, well put by a weeping, illiterate man.

And a note from Dr. Camayd-Frexais:

“My new friends from Postville involved in the relief effort inform me that they are still dealing with a very tough humanitarian crisis. So, please, if you have any opportunity for fundraising, this is the address where donations can be sent:

St. Bridget’s Hispanic Ministry Fund
c/o Sister Mary McCauley
PO Box 369
Postville, Iowa 52162″

2 responses to “The Truth About Postville

  1. As I read this post, I just kept shaking my head and thinking, “How did we get here? How could we have let this happen?” As an attorney who provides legal services to low-income people, I hold the phrase “…and justice for all” near to my heart. How can America – a country of immigrants – sit in judgment of those who come here seeking the life our ancestors sought? We pride ourselves on being a beacon of light to the world – so “civilized,” so much wealth, so much promise. And yet we ignore the very ideals that our country was founded on, the same ideals we purport to be exporting to the rest of the world, in order to – what? What was the result here? A town’s ruined economy, a mockery of the judicial system, and the nightmares of children. Maybe I’m missing it, but I don’t see justice for anyone in this solution.

    I don’t pretend to have the answers when it comes to immigration. But anyone with eyes can see that ICE raids destroy communities, devastate economies, and do nothing to further the cause of justice. It’s just bad policy. C’mon America, we can do better than this.

  2. I will be the first to admit that I don’t know a lot about immigration policy in this country, and I would bet that I’m not the only one to be a little rusty on ICE practices. I will say, however, that as a human being I have every right to demand the humane treatment of humankind. Americans pride themselves on being decent, hard working, inspirational examples for the rest of the world. The situation in Postville calls every single one of the aforementioned notions into question. What happened in Iowa is completely indecent, disgustingly inhumane, and astonishingly short-sighted.

    I am deeply ashamed and profoundly disturbed to share citizenry with the ICE agents (and those behind their policy) who are responsible for the actions detailed above. Shame on you, America, for letting “enforcement only” dictate immigration policy. JAA is right: we can do better, and should settle for nothing less.

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